10 Travel Bloggers Eat Their Way Around Asia

Ten travel bloggers share some of their favourite dishes from around ASIA on their travels. Asia is well known for it’s tasty cuisine and has been labelled as a foodie lovers paradise.   Read on to find out what some of these delicious dishes are, as these ten travel bloggers take you from country to country across Asia, to share some divine dishes. 
If you want to read more on Street Food destinations across Asia – check out our post on Southeast Asia’s TOP 8 Street Food Cities and Food Guide.

UZBEKISTAN

Been Around The Globe 

Central Asia is an area overlooked by many travellers, however the whole area is breathtaking, the locals very kind and welcoming and the food delicious! While I was in Uzbekistan, I kept eating the national dish : plov. It’s quite simple but very efficient : it’s a rice pilaf-like dish. Depending on the city in Uzbekistan, the ingredients may vary but usually rice is accompanied by vegetables, one egg, horse meat, and you typically eat a plov with an Uzbek salad : tomatoes and cucumbers, and some tea. One thing you need to know : it’s a hearty dish, and you’ll be full before you realize it!

AMRITSAR – INDIA

The Wandering Core 

A trip to Amritsar is indeed incomplete without trying the famous Amritsari Kulcha. It is an authentic Indian dish and rather Punjabi in nature with lots of butter on top of it. The kulcha is a refined floor bread prepared in tandoor aka oven and not fried. It is served with chole curry I.e. spicy chickpea curry and sliced onion & ample amount of butter spread on the kulcha. It comes in two variants, aloo(potato) or paneer (cottage cheese), I recommend trying both but I personally prefer aloo one more. It is named after Amritsar city as the flavour the kulcha has there can not be reproduced anywhere else. The flavour is said to be linked to the taste of water of Amritsar. A famous restaurant chain owner from Amritsar opened a chain in Delhi including Kulchas. But with additional expense of transferring a tanker of water from Amritsar city, that’s how he’s selling the authentic Amritsar Kulchas elsewhere. Would you like to taste these special kulchas when in India?

NEPAL

These Foreign Roads 

Literally: “pulled noodles”, thenthuk is a traditional Tibetan soup that has made it’s way throughout Nepal and Northern India over the decades by the wide-ranging refugee community. Our first encounter of the dish was in the city of Pokhara, in the Himalayan foothills of Nepal, on a cool evening in late September.

The rich broth, thick with pork fat, is subtly flavoured with kopan masala – the cardamom based spice mix found in Tibetan cuisine. Filled with tender pieces of meat and rustic, working class vegetables such as onions and cabbage, it will warm your soul on those cold Himalayan evenings.

 

SINGAPORE 

My Turn To Travel

Hainanese Chicken Rice is the unofficial national dish of Singapore. Walk around any hawker center in Singapore and you’re bound to see rows of succulent cooked chicken hanging neatly at the chicken rice stall. This dish is so-called as the cooking method traces back to its Hainanese roots. The slices of chicken are cooked in a way that retains its tenderness and the rice is cooked in chicken broth, ginger, pandan leaves and a right amount of oiliness. Top it off with the tangy red chilli sauce dip and what you get is a plate of fragrance and tastiness that cannot be found anywhere else – except at international expositions and global events abroad that feature Singapore’s food.
 

PHILIPPINES

Lexie Animé Travel

Philippines Traditional Dish – Pancit Palabok

Philippines has tons of traditional dish which are influenced by Spanish, American, Chinese, and Japanese who colonized the country way back World War II. As a Filipino, aside from our Culture, we are very proud of our Filipino Cuisine. If you ever know any Filipino, we eat big meals 3 times a day with rice and viands and we do have snack time as well that we call « merienda » the same in Spain.

Among hundreds of traditional food, I have chosen Pancit Palabok. Actually « Pancit » means noodles, it was introduced by our Chinese ancestors and till now we eat Pancit especially on Birthday celebrations. Why? Because we believe that Pancit will give us long life. If you’ll ask any Filipino about this they will give you the same response.

Since my visit to my homeland, Pancit Palabok is one of my favourite dishes to eat, it is made of rice noodles with golden shrimp sauce and top with Shrimp, Crushed or ground pork rind, Hard-boiled egg, Tinapa (smoked fish) flakes & Freshly minced green onion. I was in Cebu, Philippines when I ate the last Pancit Palabok with my family, of course, food would surely taste better when it is shared with your family.

BANGLADESH

Uncensored Travel

Bangladesh is one of the richest countries in the world when it comes to food. Especially the most famous dish of all: Biryani. It is rice, with spice. It is usually cooked with meat (chicken, beef, lamb) or seafood (fish or prawns). The amount of spices is just perfect, and they go not only in the meat, but also in the rice. One word: delicious. If you ever get the chance to get a home cooked meal, those are the best. Visiting Dhaka? Go to Sultan’s Dine! They provide food proper enough to be served at Bangladeshi weddings, beat that!

CHINA

Alysa Tarrant – Voyaging Herbivore

Deep fried lotus root (the brown balls) is a fairly common dish that can be found around China, though this particular dish turns the lotus root into vegetarian mock meatballs. Typically, lotus root is a very pretty vegetable and has a bit of a lace-like design when cut. It can be cooked in many different ways whether that be fried, boiled or steamed. It’s slightly crunchy and has a bit of a sweet taste but nevertheless it makes for a delightful main course. This particular dish can be found at a restaurant called Vegetarian Lifestyle in Shanghai, China. It’s definitely a dish worth trying for its unique flavor and presentation! To learn more about traveling and eating around China check out Voyaging Herbivore’s Chinese Adventure

PAKISTAN

HFTours 

Pakistani dishes are known for aroma and spicy flavours. Nihari is considered as Pakistan’s National dish. It is a dish that Pakistanis enjoy on a perfect Sunday morning as breakfast. This dish is enjoyed in almost all parts of Pakistan. Nihari word is extracted from Arabic word “Nihar”, meaning “Day Break”. Nihari is cooked over night. The dish is known for its spiciness and taste. It is made of Shank meat of beef or lamb and mutton, also chicken, along with bone marrow. Nihari is usually eaten with a Naan or Tandori Roti. This dish was originated in late 18th century during the era of Mughal Empire.

VIETNAM – Digital Travel Guru 

Bun Cha

Fatty grilled pork (Cha) served with rice noodles (Bun), fresh picks of herbs and a salty, sweet and slightly hot dipping sauce (nuoc cham). Totally delicious.

INDONESIA  – Digital Travel Guru 

Nasi Babi Guling

In this world few things beat roast pig, and few roast pigs can compete with that of Bali, Indonesia. Cooked whole hog on a spit roast the resulting meat comes tender, and the skin thin and crisp. The dish can only be perfected by the quintessential spice mix.

 

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Showing 17 comments
  • Ambuj
    Reply

    Such a cool blog.. it brings water in my mouth. I would love to taste nihari in Pakistan!

  • Maggie
    Reply

    Well, probably shouldn’t have made the mistake of reading this right before lunch!! These all sound amazing!!! The only one I’ve had is Briyani, which I love. I’ve never actually been to Asia, so my only experience with Asian food are restaurants in the US that may or may not be very authentic lol. But I’d really like to get to try some of these in their home countries!

  • Alex
    Reply

    First off, great post! Nihari sounds so good from Pakistan. I hope to one day visit there.

  • Smita Chandra
    Reply

    Very interesting post, mouth wateringly good pics! I’ve eaten some of these dishes and now am determined to eat some more!

  • Monica Badiu
    Reply

    What have you done to me! Now I am super hungry.. I need to plan some trips. 😁

  • Trevellers
    Reply

    Oh yummy. I’m hungry just by looking at this :p I’d say that there are better food to eat in Singapore 🙂

  • Pari
    Reply

    Ah! So many tasty dishes. The biryani is my favorite. It reminds me of my days in Bangalore when the aroma of Biryani in a shop would drift to my nose whenever I passed by.

  • Alex Trembath
    Reply

    I’m really enjoying the diversity of experience that are given voice in this blog! As a major foodie, reading this made my mouth water. I got back from Vietnam last month… bun cha was my absolute favourite, and it’s so hard to find it in the UK! Hope to see more food articles on here 🙂 🙂 🙂

  • anshul
    Reply

    I have been to Amritsar and found that the food was too overrated and pricey. But I am visiting Singapore in 4 days, I am totally excited to try the local food.

  • Reply

    Wait what?! Deep fried lotus root?! I’m so intrigued. I didn’t even know you could eat lotus root. Well, that’s now on my bucket list too lol.

  • Mohana Das
    Reply

    I am drooling! I love kulchas. And everything else on this list looks so alluring and delicious. I have never had lotus root but it sounds interesting. I know they are pretty popular in Kashmir.

  • The Asian Abroad
    Reply

    First of all, I love the layout of the blog!!
    I’m from Singapore but living in Barcelona now and I have to say that I am missing all the food in Asia. Reading this and looking at the photos are literally making my mouth water. YAY to chicken rice and biryani!!

  • Faith Coates
    Reply

    I have never seen Nihari written about before and it is one of my most favourite dishes. In London Ontario where I lived there was this tiny little Pakistani restaurant in a crappy mall – they have a small sort of booth and you can get Nihari the first time I tried it (with lamb) I was hooked and not only that but they do 32 different samosas. Heaven on a plate.

  • Kylee
    Reply

    I think Asian food is one of my favorite things in the world! When we travel anywhere else in the world I always crave anything Asian! There is a sweet, salty, spicy component to each dish yet they all taste so very different. Great collab (not biased cause we are in it haha) Thank you for making this!

  • Reply

    China looked like my favourite, although they all have their qualities. Very interesting post!

  • Tif
    Reply

    These all look so great!!!! I have been to Asia once & i am craving to try so much more of these foods!! I need to get back there and try more of these ideas!

  • Ali Dunnell
    Reply

    What a great idea for a blog post – and you’ve included some really interesting dishes and places. I love eating Asian food but have not heard of all of these dishes, so I guess I am going to have to visit some more places 🙂

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